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Online Courses

Online courses are an excellent way to supplement traditional on campus courses at JSerra Catholic High School. JSerra is committed to providing a wide range of online courses that enhance learning and provide flexibility for students. We recognize that students may want to take additional classes to augment their schedule, advance in a subject, or remediate a course. Because of the flexibility of online courses, students have the opportunity to complete coursework during times that are conducive to their schedules.

Catalog

English

English I

Join us in English I for a journey. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore the unknown, search for identity and equality, and seek achievement, opportunity, and understanding. You will read to analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and research to examine the results of actions in the real world. The lessons in each module will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

English II

Join us in English II to see how the human experience is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, we explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as Laughter, Obstacles, Betrayal, and Fear. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

Prerequisites: English I
Length: Year

English III

In English III, the writing and insights of authors throughout our history are collected in the fast-paced pages of The Virtual Times. You’ll gain an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. You’ll discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. You’ll also be asked to observe, investigate and report on stories of today. The goal is to be thorough, accurate and compelling in your writing.

Prerequisites: English I and II
Length: Year

English IV

Why do people do what they do? English IV you will give you a front row seat to study and analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and research to examine the results of actions in the real world. The lessons in each module will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing.

Prerequisites: English I, II and III
Length: Year

Math

Algebra I

The skills acquired in this course contain the basic knowledge needed for all future high school math courses. Each module in this course is presented in a step-by-step way right on the computer screen. Hands-on labs make the numbers, graphs, and equations more real. The content is tied to real-world applications like sports, travel, business, and health. This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve all kinds of mathematical problems.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Algebra II

Algebra II is an advanced course using hands-on activities, applications, group interactions, and the latest technology allowing students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’ journey through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate the effects of an equation on its graph using technology. Students have opportunities to work with their peers on specific lessons.

Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Geometry
Length: Year

AP Calculus AB

Students in this course will walk in the footsteps of Newton and Leibnitz. An interactive course framework combines with exciting on-line course delivery to make calculus an adventure. The course includes a study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and the integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, as well as the applications of derivatives and integrals. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: Department chair approval; Algebra I, Geometry and Statistics
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry
Length: Year

AP Calculus BC

This course offers a combination of assessment and instruction in an online environment containing but not limited to the areas of functions, functions and limits, differential calculus, and integral calculus. The course applies differential calculus to finding the slope of a curve, solving problems with related rates, calculating motion properties of moving particles, etc. It then applies integral calculus to finding the areas of irregular regions in a plane, finding volumes of rotation by various methods, and other scientific applications. Finally, the course explores analytic geometry, series, and convergence, as well as polynomial series and approximations. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: Department chair approval; Algebra I, Geometry and Statistics
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry
Length: Year

AP Statistics

Advanced Placement Statistics will introduce students to exploring data, sampling and experimentation by planning and conducting studies, anticipating patterns using probability and simulation, and employing statistical inference in order to analyze data and draw conclusions. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: Department chair approval; Algebra I, Geometry and Statistics
Length: Year

Calculus

Walk in the footsteps of Newton and Leibnitz. An interactive text and graphing software combine with the exciting on-line course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. This course includes a study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions, and the applications of derivatives and integrals.

Prerequisites: Department chair approval; Algebra I, Geometry and Statistics
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry.
Length: Year.

Geometry

Geometry exists everywhere in the world around you. We use it to build bridges, to design maps, or to create perspective in paintings. Throughout this course, you will use problem solving and real world application to gain the knowledge of geometric concepts and their practical uses.

Prerequisites: Algebra I
Length: Year

World Languages

Chinese I

Students join various native speakers of Mandarin Chinese as they give a lively introduction to the language and its rich culture. Set in their everyday environment, the native speakers take students through different daily scenarios and give them the necessary skills to read, write, and speak Chinese. Students learn the basic Chinese language.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Chinese II

Chinese 2 enables the students to further develop the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing of Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. Students are immersed in Chinese culture as virtual exchange students in China. Virtual excursions from one Chinese city to another expand their vocabulary helping them learn to interact with others and use appropriate terms to communicate in various everyday situations.

Prerequisites: Chinese I
Length: Year

Chinese III

The Chinese III course greatly improves students’ reading abilities, and students are able to write in Chinese in various formats such as journal, letter, invitation, and essay. The course also enriches and fortifies the students’ knowledge and skills in writing simplified Chinese characters. Students learn more essential knowledge of Chinese culture, including the origins, histories, anecdotes, and etiquettes for various cultural settings, events, and occasions.

Prerequisites: Chinese I & II
Length: Year

French I

Bienvenue! Welcome! Come and join various native French speakers as they give students a lively introduction to the language and its rich culture. Join them in their everyday environment as they take students through different daily scenarios and give them the necessary skills to read, write, and speak French. Students learn the basic French language.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

French II

Salut! Get set for some more adventure! In French II, students are immersed in the French language and culture. This course is full of engaging and interactive videos, dialogs, presentations, self-checks, and much more! The purpose of this course is to further develop the French communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. In French II, students will broaden their French vocabulary and knowledge of grammar.

Prerequisites: French I
Length: Year

Latin I

There is a reason “all roads lead to Rome.” In this course, students find out for themselves as they take their first steps on a lifelong journey of discovery. Students improve their command of the English language by studying Latin and gain a better understanding of today’s laws and culture by getting into the Roman mind. Latin I is the most comprehensive way to begin. Students will build a foundation in Latin grammar and vocabulary.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Latin II

In Latin II, the plots and the characters that populated ancient Rome will come alive. In this course, students build on their knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary. In the process, students sense the beauty of the language and the passion of those who spoke it. Roman engineering, art, commerce and system of laws were all supported by a clear, expressive and flexible language - a language in which students will be able to communicate.

Prerequisites: Latin I
Length: Year

Latin III

In Latin III, students take their knowledge and appreciation of Latin to the next level. Students read some of the best Latin prose and poetry ever written or spoken; students visit the library of great authors. The library card gives them access to the timeless words of the greatest Roman poets, storytellers, and orators. Students’ skills with the Latin language give them direct access to the beauty and power of these great authors’ thoughts. Students will strengthen their vocabulary as well as their appreciation for well-crafted writing.

Prerequisites: Latin I & II
Length: Year

Spanish I

¡Bienvenidos! Welcome! Students are taking a virtual trip to Spain, Cuba, Colombia, and Argentina. As students travel to each country, they learn how to speak Spanish in many practical and useful ways. Students learn how to greet people, introduce themselves, and speak about their home, family, school, and community. As students learn basic vocabulary and grammar skills, they expand on their knowledge and learn to speak about more complex topics such as shopping, weather, sports, entertainment, and leisure activities. Students learn basic Spanish grammar to help them build fluency and understand the structure of the Spanish language.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Spanish II

In Spanish II, students travel virtually through Central America and the Caribbean, spending time in museums, traffic jams, and even the hospital. In this course, students broaden their Spanish vocabulary and their knowledge of grammar. Students strengthen Spanish listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students also experience the beauty and expressiveness of a language that is shared by different people and cultures throughout the world.

Prerequisites: Spanish I
Length: Year

Spanish III

Dive into the rich diversity of Hispanic culture across the globe by exploring the tastes, sights, and sounds of this dynamic language that reflects triumph, struggle, celebration, and so much more. During this cultural journey, students improve conversational, vocabulary, and writing skills through authentic tasks. Take your Spanish language abilities to the next level!

Prerequisites: Spanish II
Length: Year

Spanish IV

Spanish IV will expand students' language skills and take them on a fascinating cultural journey. Through exploring the past, students will come to understand the importance of community, family, and personal relationships. They will be immersed in culture—movement, art, music, literature. Meeting real people and hearing their stories will allow students to gain new vocabulary, have better command of the language, and understand their role as a global citizen.

Prerequisites: Spanish III
Length: Year

Social Sciences

AP Human Geography

The AP Human Geography course is designed to provide college level instruction on the patterns and processes that impact the way humans understand, use, and change Earth’s surface. Students use geographic models, methods, and tools to examine human social organization and its effect on the world in which we live. Students are challenged to use maps and geographical data to examine spatial patterns and analyze the changing interconnections among people and places. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

AP Macroeconomics

Understand the choices you make as a producer, consumer, investor, and taxpayer. This course provides you with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how a society must organize its limited resources to satisfy its unlimited wants. This course meets the economics high school graduation requirement. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Semester

AP Microeconomics

By taking on the role of a leader at a fictitious company, you will learn fundamental economic concepts, including scarcity, opportunity costs and trade-offs, productivity, economic systems and institutions, exchange, money, and interdependence. This course meets the economics high school graduation requirement. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Semester

AP United States History

Examine key themes and events of our history, including American identity, diversity, religion, culture, war, and slavery, as well as economic, political, and demographic changes. Students will also analyze globalization and environmental issues. This course meets the United States history high school graduation requirement. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Economics with Financial Literacy

Students will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect students and others. As students progress through the course, students will recognize that the costs and benefits of choices connect individuals and groups around the world. The purpose of this course is to help students become a smart consumer who understands the flow of an economy between individuals, businesses, governments, and the rest of the world.

Prerequisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended
Length: Semester

U.S. Government

Responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy.

Prerequisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended
Length: Semester

U.S. History

In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War through today. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course also gives students the opportunity to conduct research and apply their learning to current, real-world problems.

Prerequisites: 10th or 11th grade status and English I recommended
Length: Year

World History

In Segment I, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed, discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires, and journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan. to learn how knights and samurais lived. Students will investigate the rise and fall of great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa, then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. In Segment II students will learn about advancements during the Age of Enlightenment and the social and political revolutions that followed. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Visual and Performing Arts

AP Art History

Students will be active participants, engaging with art and its context as they read, research, and collaborate to learn about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art. The AP Art History course is structured around three big ideas, three essential questions, twelve learning objectives, and ten content areas outlined within the College Board Advanced Placement Art History Framework. Each content area is represented by a prescribed image set accompanied by enduring understanding and essential knowledge statements that provide required contextual information to serve as a foundation and catalyst for student learning within the course. The intention is for students to explore art in its historic and cultural contexts. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: Recommended for students in 10th, 11th, and 12th in conjunction with or who have successfully completed World History
Length: Year

Creative Photography I

In this course, students will find their visual voice, learn how photography is a pictorial document, how to visually represent experiences, and understand photography for the use of self-expression. This course includes the history of photography, the basics of the camera, photography techniques, why people take photographs, how to constructively critique photographs, and careers in photography. Students need a digital camera with at least the following mode options: portrait, landscape, action, and macro.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Guitar I

The high school Guitar I course is a two-segment introduction to the basics of music and guitar. Students with little or no experience playing guitar will be guided as they learn to play guitar, music notation, musical styles, simple and full-strum chords, foundational music literacy and theory, and major scales. Students need a six-string guitar. Grab your guitar and get ready to jam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Music of the World

In this course, students learn how to understand the impact of music as well as how it represents the culture it was created within and reflects the spirit of the human condition. Students learn to know and understand music by being able to distinguish and identify cultures on both local and global levels. In this course, students gain a historical perspective of music, covering a variety of styles and developments from the Middle Ages through the 21st century. In their musical journey, students acquire basic understanding and knowledge of singing, listening, and playing instruments.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Electives

AP Computer Science A

The AP Computer Science A course is an introductory computer science course. A large part of the course involves developing the skills to write programs or parts of programs that correctly solve specific problems. The course also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: Algebra I and II recommended
Length: Year

AP Psychology

AP Psychology is a college-level course providing students with an overview of the development of human behaviors and thoughts. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences. Psychology is a diverse social and biological science with multiple perspectives and interpretations. The primary emphasis of this course is to help students develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorize terms and technical details. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Health

With a focus on health and fitness, this course guides student to be active and healthy now and for a lifetime. Effective strategies and techniques are a foundation of the course so that students can continually make improvements in all areas of wellness. Students set personal goals in four areas of wellness: physical, emotional, social, and academic. The course uses videos, graphics, and interactive learning opportunities to encourage students to eat well, get up, and be active. Leading a healthy lifestyle is the best way to prevent health problems before they occur—this course helps students do just that.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Semester

Journalism

This course provides students with the fundamental basics of journalism. Students begin by exploring the history of American journalism, examining different media such as print, radio, television, and internet journalism. Students learn how to write a news story, a feature story, and an editorial, with a focus on research, analyzing the reliability of sources, conducting interviews, writing leads, revising, and self-editing. Students will also take a close look at different careers in journalism, ethics in journalism, and visual layouts using technology, including web 2.0 tools.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Semester

Personal Fitness

This course was designed to offer three modules of motivation for teens. The modules—Move Strong, Live Well, and Eat Healthy—guide students through learning about strength and endurance training, choosing lifetime fitness activities, and connecting nutrition to lifetime fitness. The course is filled with language and images that reflect strength and diversity to motivate teens and allow them to envision themselves committing to fitness.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Year

Psychology I

Understanding the thoughts, emotions and behaviors of self and others is critical to developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships. In Psychology I, students learn theories of historically significant psychologists who laid the foundation for scientific research and a clearer understanding of the human mind. This course explores how psychological perspectives influence personality and play a role in human development across the lifespan. Students examine how behaviors are developed, memories are stored and language is acquired. Students also learn about the symptoms and classifications of psychological disorders, along with the various forms of treatments available. After completing this course, students will be equipped with problem solving strategies and even learn methods to cope with stress. Practical, everyday application of the content is a focus of this course.

Prerequisites: None
Length: Semester